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Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

May 17, 2012 04:33PM
TheThinker Wrote:
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> That would be about 66,000 plants at maturity.
> How could that be hidden? I think I have to
> rethink my idea as to the size of the park.

Julie: thought that was an interesting question and found this amidst a long text on how to grow pot...

"The Ability to hide plants amongst the flora in fields is an art and skill improved upon through practice. One favorite technique is to hide plants on the south side of bushes so that passers by will have difficulty spotting the plant(s). Plants still get adequate light in spite of the appearance of being crowded by the larger bush. The best hiding spot for erb is where people have their view blocked from all sides and has the appearance of being impenetrable. In areas where the vegetation growth is less than three feet the erb may need to be trimmed back or tied to the ground in order to create smaller bushier plants. Fields with small vegetation growth may have poor soil or can be dry upland environments where the soil frequently becomes too dry so use caution. Making erb junior blend in with the other plants in the field will minimize risk. In order to grow plants efficiently, an outdoor grower must use the natural landscape to his or her advantage."

"Making a Trail

One of the ways to ensure success is by creating trails that are not visible to passers by. This is easier in some places than in others. Areas having dense undergrowth with lots of sunlight can be ideal because plant growth is so rapid it will erase any damage to the vegetation between trips during the Spring and Summer. If you are growing plants in areas easy to spot trails then make the path weave back and forth so it becomes difficult for people to see a trail. Making a hidden trail to the site(s) is important because it allows the grower to minimize getting ripped off or worse, caught. People wander through undeveloped areas and follow trails to nowhere all the time. Their access can be limited through thoughtful planning of pathways and proper care in using them. When you walk through your entrance, do everything possible not to damage any of the foliage, especially toward the late Summer and early Fall. At this time of the year, damaged foliage usually will not regrow and this is when the plants need as much cover as possible. There are two things to keep in mind when making a trail to your site(s): 1) Can you see the trail you just made, if not that's great, if so look for ways to cover areas that look like a trail; 2) The more difficult it is for you to get to the site, the less likely someone else will try."
Subject Author Posted

$100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

TimBuk2 May 14, 2012 04:41PM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

TheThinker May 14, 2012 07:43PM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

Julie May 17, 2012 04:33PM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

TheThinker May 18, 2012 09:37AM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

Dogwood May 20, 2012 04:49PM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

DanaBallard1953 June 09, 2012 05:56AM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

Edenite May 17, 2012 09:25AM

Re: $100-million pot farm destroyed in Topanga State Park

Dogwood May 17, 2012 11:08AM



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